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Solve The Depression Epidemic With Botox Injections

woman depressedSince one of every 10 American adults has depression, wouldn’t it be great if something could be done to help it. One potential answer — partial facial paralysis — has been underutilized and understudied until recently. Could it be the answer so many people are looking for?

And since women are twice as susceptible to depression as men, could the use of Botox injections to help clinical depression in women be an important development in women’s health?

It all starts with Eric Finzi.

As a child, Finzi studied his mother’s face very carefully. And she was a woman who wore lots of distress on her face. He knew her depression was worse when her brow lowered to darken her eyes.

Finzi chose a career in dermatological surgery. But understanding his mother was always on his mind. He spent a good deal of his spare time reading about mental illness and psychology. And she got worse. When Fenzi was just 36 years old, his father died, and his mother’s depression worsened to the point that she was almost unreachable. She suffered for years more and finally died at age 74.

Meanwhile, Finzi also painted.

Not long after the death of his mother, Finzi undertook painting a series of portraits based on photos that depicted French women who were institutionalized in the 19th century. From his study of his mother’s condition, his medical education and these paintings, Finzi was becoming a face expert.

During his office hours, he spent a good deal of time looking at frown lines and injecting them with Botox.

All of this led him to start thinking very seriously about the connection between this way we feel and what we express on our faces. In particular, he wondered about the connection between depression and expression. How could the two be completely separate? And could making the face less pained make the mind less depressed?

As Finzi thought about it more, he realized that the physical expression on our faces is an important part of how we handle emotion. You can’t really feel angry or sad without moving your face, but it’s possible, he mused, that you might not be able to feel emotions as strongly or as persistently if your face didn’t line up with your feelings in the way it’s supposed to. Could that really be possible? Could it be that the face transmits its expression back to the brain, and this transmission enhances the feeling you’re experiencing?

At the time Finzi was doing his painting, no one had ever studied such a thing as the hypothesis he was forming. How could an experiment along those lines be devised? And how could researchers understand if a thought that was causing a frown didn’t manifest itself?

But Finzi realized Botox was the answer. If he could inject depressed patients with Botox, he could study whether any of them went into a state of remission. In 2003, he launched a small study, paralyzing the frown muscles of some patients so they couldn’t express fear, anger or sadness. Nine of his 10 patients with depression got better. The study was published in 2006.

Recently, a wider-scale study has been published that backs up what Finzi found, and the link between Botox injections and relieving depression is growing stronger. So why aren’t more people taking action based on these studies?

While Finzi’s mother can’t benefit from the results of her son studying her pained expression and the expressions of others for so many years, at least others can. And it would be a real shame if nothing much comes from what Finzi and researchers who have come after him have found about the link between depression, frowning and therapeutic Botox.

Health professionals (including psychiatrists) interested in learning to inject Botox, see our Botox Course, and/or call (858) 550-9533

Botox- A Dentist’s Advantage

dentist botoxBeing a dentist is an overall satisfying and profitable profession. It gives you the chance to make a difference in someone’s quality of life in an unparalleled way. However, with the sheer number of dentists dotting the cities, it’s highly likely that your practice is in danger of becoming one in many. It’s not a pleasant prospect, but it is possible.

With a situation like this, here’s a huge, revolutionary sort of opportunity for all the dentists out there who are looking to improve their practice- Botox. Technically, this would include a lot of procedures that come under the header of ‘elective aesthetics’. Botox, dermal fillers, sclerotherapy, all these are procedures that, once upon a time, were carried out only by dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons. Nowadays, registered nurses, physician assistants, gynecologists, chiropractors- practically anyone with a healthcare background can obtain a license and independently start providing Botox to their patients. This is where dentists come in.

The advantage that dentists have is that they are intimately acquainted with details of facial structure, as well as most cosmetic surgeons, even. Botox providers like nurses and assistants who get their licenses and give Botox to patients in clinical and nonclinical settings, are not even well informed about facial anatomy and physiology. They are simply trained to give Botox to patients in specific locations and by specific techniques. Dentists, on the other hand, use injections into facial structures on a fairly regular basis, and have a much better understanding of the facial anatomy and physiology. So not only are dentists much better qualified for dealing with Botox, it’s a much easier procedure for dentists to get the hang of too. Dentists are already experienced with injections in the oral and facial area, and both Botox and dermal fillers work on similar principles. In fact, much of a dentist’s daily work is a lot more invasive and deals with deeper structures than Botox involves, so it’s not a procedure that has a steep learning curve at all.

Botox is a hugely cost effective procedure. Once you’ve funded the initial set up, each patient requires only twenty to twenty five minutes of work, generally even less. So your patient traffic increases manifold, and patient satisfaction is maintained as well. Not to mention, once your patient base has been established for Botox in addition to your regular patients, the number of people who access you for Botox will increase steadily. And dermal fillers are equally simple to administer as well. The biggest plus is that these are procedures with very quick results, so if done correctly, patient satisfaction will skyrocket, and your ratings.

And the side effects are minimal. Adverse effects are next to none and except for a borderline risk of allergic reaction, it is completely safe to perform. Explaining the procedure to patients in detail and reassuring them goes a long way in prepping them. That reassurance is exactly why patients will approach their dentists with more confidence, and will keep coming back for the repeats and spread your name even more. It’s a money multiplier at barely any initial expenditure, easy to acquire experience, and with their pre existing training, dentists are imminently suited for administering Botox already!

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Botox- An Advantage For Physicians

doctor botoxThere was a time, not so long ago, when giving Botox to patients was strictly the prerogative of cosmetic surgeons and plastic surgeons. It was a restricted access field, with restricted income, and all sorts of myths and privileges surrounded it. Now, though.. Botox is for everyone.

Being a physician puts you in an incredibly advantageous position to give Botox. First off, physicians have the best knowledge of facial structure. Whether it is muscle layers, innervations, bone structure, insertion and attachment of muscles and the skin covering them- every physician has covered it all in detail in the course of their study. This automatically gives physicians the best footing to decide the placement of fillers and levels at which to administer Botox. Administering botox is itself not a complicated procedure- in fact, it’s incredibly simple. Anyone with a background in healthcare can be licensed to provide Botox to patients, such as dentists and nurses, but there is always a clear preference among patients to avail of Botox from doctors. And why wouldn’t they? Till a few years ago Botox was only available to movie stars and page three personalities. Now, anyone can access it, right down to housewives and schoolteachers. Botox is provided even in spas and beauty salons, but the quality of these treatments and the experience of the people who provide it, is extremely deficient. Patients seek a qualified person to get Botox from, and who better than a physician?

While that is from a patient’s point of view, from a physician’s point of view, offering Botox facilities is sheer benefit too. Botox is a minor procedure that requires you to allot approximately 20 -30 minutes per patient, has a very small risk margin and minuscule chance of side effects or adverse effects. In addition, the initial set up is not a considerable investment. Once you’ve obtained licensing in accordance to the laws of your state, you’re set up to provide Botox. Experience is easy to build up, especially if you’re a physician with an established patient base. One thing to make sure of is that every patient is completely made to be at ease and reassured, and your work environment is equally soothing and professional. This extends to your manner as well, as well as your technique. It’s an additive process. The more patients you have, the more experience you acquire, and it continues. Especially once your patients spread the word, your patient base is only going to grow.  Administering Botox is incredibly time efficient, and allows you to help a lot of people as well.

This becomes even more significant when you consider how many people get Botox from unreliable establishments. Practically all the Botox ‘horror’ stories are from people who went to a backroom parlor or weekend getaway to get Botox and it went wrong. A physician who provides Botox is the safest alternative for all parties involved. In fact, if you have a well trained nursing staff, you can delegate authority and distribute the workload, and expand your practice. This even includes branching out to beauty salons which will provide Botox to patients with a physician’s supervision. And not just Botox, but dermal fillers are covered in most training courses as well. There are limitless options to expansion, once you start Botox.

Sign up for the Dentox Botox Training Program here

Botox- Advantages for Nurses

nurse botoxBeing a nurse is taxing enough. Long hours, endless shifts on rotation and demanding work do not leave much time left over to consider the entrepreneurial aspect of your job. But there certain options available that can not only make your life much easier, but make your income and working hours more streamlined. One of these options, and probably the most lucrative of these options, is offering Botox.

Botox used to be a tool of the stars. It was a luxury, but now it has become a readily available amenity to all. Anyone can avail Botox, be it a housewife or page three personality. The best part is that anyone with a basic medical background can obtain the license to administer Botox- this is the advantage for nurses. Most states permit nurses and nurse practitioners to give Botox to patients, the license is easily obtainable. Once you have a license, you can see a huge amount of patients as the demand is extremely high. For nurses who are already working in established practices, this is an even bigger advantage as they already have a patient base to build upon. Botox requires a small amount of time per patient and the income generated is a tremendous boost. What’s more, offering Botox services at your practice will increase your patient base manifold too.

Another reason to consider Botox is the chance to migrate away from the control of the practice. Licenses nurses and nurse practitioners do not require a supervising physician to administer Botox, so automatically, that gives you a degree of autonomy and independence. RNs do give Botox under a physician’s supervision, or if the physician is onsite, but once you have your own license, you’re not obligated to have the physician with you anymore.

The course itself is brief and easy to finish. Depending upon where you take it and getting your license, it should take you around two weeks to finish it. Most courses offer a chance to cover the entire topic in a comprehensive manner, whether it is an online course or a classroom style set up. In either case, a reliable course will prepare you for any eventuality.

And you do not have to limit yourself to just Botox. With the right training, you can offer services for dermal fillers like Restylane, and using Botox for therapeutic purposes as well, such as chronic pain management. The advantage of offering dermal fillers too is that your training will cover it, and it’s one of the treatments that give patients immediate results, so patient satisfaction levels are high as well. Your expertise will build upon itself, as will your patient base, and this is a sure shot way of getting both patients and money pouring in. You may need to pay attention to the administrative side of things as well, especially if you’re migrating away from a previous practice. Things such as independent accounts, maintaining a comforting working atmosphere for patients to feel at ease in, the sourcing and quality of materials you’ll be using- but these are all situational. You can just as easily keep working with an established practice. Or, if you want to, set up your own!

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Breast Augmentations Down, Botox Up According To Recent Statistics

injecting botoxThe number of cosmetic surgery procedures continues to grow, according to statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. From 2011 to 2012, the rise was 5 percent — up to 14 million procedures. And the trend has continued. But fewer women are opting for breast augmentation, the statistics show.

Even reconstructive surgery was up during the period covered in the statistics by about 1 percent.

Overall, the demand for cosmetic procedures continues to grow — and the growth is driven by the very strong demand for minimally invasive procedures like Botox and dermal fillers while the demand for invasive plastic surgery remains strong but stable or slightly declining. The plastic surgeons’ organization notes that some who start with less invasive cosmetic procedures may later opt for more invasive surgery if it becomes necessary.

Botox and so-called soft tissue fillers remains the most sought-after of all minimally invasive procedures in the United States. About 6 million people got Botox during the covered period, up about 6 percent. Doctors and other medical professionals who have been through recognized Botox training can administer Botox as part of their regular practices, at spas and at other locations. The injections can treat wrinkles as well as misaligned eyes, underarm sweating and more.

While most invasive surgeries showed a decline, breast surgeries took the sharpest hit. The decline in breast augmentation and breast lifts for women went down a moderate 2 percent while breast reductions for men went up a strong 5 percent in 2012.

The most performed invasive procedures continue to be breast augmentation and body contouring, although both declined. Yet more and more consumers are choosing to get rid of wrinkles with facial rejuvenation procedures like Botox and dermal fillers so they can maintain or restore the much-sought-after youthful appearance.

These statistics prove that medical professionals who choose to start offering minimally invasive cosmetic procedures like Botox are getting into a field with rising demand. And that’s a great place to be.

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Vanity Wins Over Frugality, Even In Hard Times

Botox injectionEven at the depths of the economic downturn of 2008 and 2009, men and women who had turned to Botox injections and other cosmetic procedures in the past to maintain or restore the look of youthfulness were willing to spend hundreds and sometimes thousands to keep up the regimen, many medical professionals noted.

Those who hadn’t yet started on a facial maintenance program when bad time hit often opted to put aside the facelift and instead have injections and laser treatments.

And that’s all great news for those considering adding Botox training to their arsenal of tools to help patients.

One woman in Nebraska told a major newspaper in 2008 that even though she lost her job as a bookstore manager and was $140,000 in debt from paying for a child’s college, she didn’t give up her Botox and Restylane injections. She equated having the injections to eating comfort food. They simply made her feel better, she said.

Almost three of four plastic surgeons surveyed in 2008 said that demand for minimally invasive cosmetic procedures remained strong despite the nation’s worst economic condition in decades. But the number of more complex procedures — like breast augmentation and nose reshaping, for example — dipped significantly.

Once again, these comments and statistics show how demand for Botox and similar procedures endures even when there’s no money for anything else. That means those with Botox training remain in demand no matter the economic situation.

No statistics are available much farther back because most facial rejuvenation drugs weren’t yet available when there were previous economic downturns. Botox has actually been on the market for well over 20 years, but its approval for cosmetic use didn’t come until 2002, right about the time when the dotcom bust was coming to an end. And dermal fillers like Juvederm and Restylane have been on the market even less time.

Speaking of dermal fillers, their use stayed steady and even showed a rise during the economic mess. According to one dermatologist, investment opportunities were so bad at the time that people started investing whatever money they had in themselves instead of in the market or other traditional investment vehicles.

A plastic surgeon in New York City (see our Botox training program in New York) commented in 2008 that during bad times, even those who have relatively stable jobs are afraid to take as much time off from work as surgery requires, so they opt for minimally invasive procedures like dermal fillers and Botox to “tide them over” until they can afford a more complex procedure. And in some cases, they find that the results from injections are good enough they don’t have to opt for surgery later on.

There’s also the idea that you can pay as you go with cosmetic procedure. While it can cost $15,000 or more to have a facelift, patients can pay from a few hundred to a couple thousand dollars for a Botox or dermal filler program and be done with it. And since Botox lasts for months, they can come back when they have more money or simply let it go if they can’t afford it for a while. There’s no need to run up a huge credit card bill for a big-ticket cosmetic surgery procedure.

No matter the economic situation, patients often see aesthetic treatments as a way to keep their jobs, not just an indulgence to vanity. For those who work in a competitive business environment, having Botox can be one way to stay in competition with younger but less experienced contenders.

The Nebraska woman says that people routinely spend hundreds on color highlights and styling for their hair, so it makes sense to spend similarly on her face.

Wouldn’t you like to increase the performance of your practice and stay competitive in your work environment by learning the new skills involved in Botox injections? While you’re helping your patients, you could also be helping yourselves to a more competitive practice and to greater profits.

Time and time again, media reports tells of people in financial hard times who will forego eating out, going to shows and remodeling their homes — but they won’t forgo the facial injections and other minimally invasive procedures that help them maintain consistent and acceptable looks despite the progression of aging. Some may increase intervals between procedures a bit, but they simply aren’t willing to stop.

In times of financial turmoil, there are also tips and techniques that practices can use to maintain and even increase interest in cosmetic procedures. One is to run aggressive promotions and big discounts. This is especially common in areas where there is a lot of competition among Botox injectors and may or may not be necessary in other areas.

While some medical professionals are reluctant to advertise or promote their services because of fear they will look vane or overly promotional, many others have put aside these qualms from their pasts and stepped up to the plate — with great results.

Some Botox injectors now offer gift certificates around the holidays, two-for-one specials and other great deals to make Botox seem more possible and more appealing, no matter the state of the economy.

The economy may be strong today, but some individuals are still having problems making ends meet. And you can bet these people aren’t forgoing their cosmetic procedures.

Why not get your share of the funds they’re spending on looking good by offering Botox injections at your practice? Once you get Botox training, there’s little startup cost and a world of profits that you can tap into.

Economy May Be Sluggish, But Botox Sales Continue To Rise

Botox Upward trendNo matter what you think about the state of the economy as a whole, Botox sales are continuing to rise — often at a double-digit clip. That means now’s a great time to benefit from a Botox training course.

No one knows more about the benefits of Botox than Allergan’s CEO David Pyott. He’s nearing 60 years old and his forehead doesn’t show any wrinkles. That’s because his company makes Botox as well as some dermal fillers. And because of that, he doesn’t really have anything to worry about.

The firm, when last we checked, was worth perhaps $26 billion, and sales continue to climb. And while many CEOs at big pharmaceutical companies tend to stay just four or five years, Pyott has been at the helm of Allergan more than a decade and a half.

Through the economic downturn of the mid 2000s, his firm proved how American companies can thrive even if the economy isn’t.

You see, Allergan may be known for wrinkle preparations, breast implants and fillers like Juvederm, but Allergan gets half its revenues from prescription medications that treat serious medical conditions. So they’re in the cosmetic industry and also in the business of helping people in other ways. If you add cosmetic Botox to your practice, you could join them in that dual business.

You see, Allergan has wholeheartedly embraced the idea that the American and worldwide population is aging. Today’s aging population is determined to stave off the signs of time in whatever ways are possible, and Botox is one of those ways. Even in 2009 when most companies experienced falling sales, Botox held steady. And by 2010, sales were above the 2008 levels. Sales in 2012 were nearly $2 billion. And shouldn’t your practice be getting your share of the Botox administering business?

If you think about it, Botox is one of the most recognizable consumer brands in our nation and has a huge market share compared to similar products. That’s because people want to look better and perhaps a few years younger, meaning it’s now a social trend to alter your appearance to cheat aging just a bit. That benefits Allergan and practices that offer Botox because the product markets itself. People already have the demand, and the product simply steps in to meet that demand.

A bad economy could actually benefit the aesthetics market. People must invest in their looks when times are bad for professional reasons as well as personal ones. As the financial crisis was at its height, one plastic surgeon who offers Botox in New York City (more about our Botox training program in New York) said that he had no trouble getting people to pay $200 per Botox treatment and $500 per syringe of Juvederm.

The same strength in the marketplace has been seen for breast implants, which some consider a related procedure. In both 2009 and 2010, expensive cosmetic surgeries went down in popularity because of the cost and the fact that many of these procedures require missing time from work. But in the following years, breast implants have increased in popularity along with less invasive cosmetic treatments, indicating overall strong demand for cosmetic procedures of many different kind.

Botox is also increasing in demand overseas. That bodes well for the continuation of the Botox trend. There are millions of citizens of India, China and even Brazil and other nations who are turning to Botox and similarly affordable cosmetic procedures. These consumers are maturing along with their developing nations and starting to take on many of the habits once reserved for Americans. This trend started with soft drinks and continues with fast food, movies, expensive coffee drinks, fancy cars and now Botox and related cosmetic procedures that their doctors can learn as quickly and easily as American ones.

The CEO promotes an important factor that has kept an American company like Allergan in the lead in its industry when foreign companies control so many other aspects of American business: innovation. Allergan has invested greatly in research and development in recent years. In fact, it invested just less than $700 million in 2009 and increased that amount to nearly $900 million 2011. It went up to $1 billion in 2013. As many of as 19 percent of the 10,500 people who work for the company are employed in some aspect of research and development. It even added capacity in New Jersey recently at a time when other companies in its industry are still floundering.

Additionally, Allergan has never been content to consider Botox only a cosmetic drug. There are problems in the world other than wrinkles, and Botox can be used to help correct some of them. That’s why only about half of all Botox sales today are for cosmetic purposes. The rest is sold for therapeutic purposes. There are 85 nations in the world that approve Botox injections for the treatment of as many of 25 different conditions. This includes neurogenic bladder conditions in people with spinal cord injuries, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis as well as TMD and similar conditions. It is also approved for chronic migraines.

The Affordable Care Act will cost Allergan some money in additional fees. But that’s nothing for the CEO to frown about given the increasing sales.

And adding Botox injections to any sort of medical or dental practice isn’t anything to frown about either. It can lead to additional patients and procedures that can lead, in turn, to additional income. And it all starts with a quick and simple online Botox training class.

Can You Get In On The Expected 50 Percent Growth In Botox?

Botox upward trendIf you’ve had Botox training from Dentox, you’re poised to get in on the 50 percent growth of Botox demand expected over the coming decade. According to a report last year, that’s how big the demand for botulinum toxin type A cosmetic procedures will be.

Over the preceding decade, demand for Botox injections has already been strong and steady. Even as so many economic indicators dipped sharply in the recession of 2008, Botox demand slipped only a little.

Millions of people get Botox every year, and why shouldn’t you get in on the profits from these easy-to-administer shots? After all, the training is quick and easy, and the startup costs for your practice are small.

 

So why is demand increasing? Here are 11 important reasons:

1. Botox has come of age. Once something only celebrities did, getting Botox injections is now mainstream — and something that people from all walks of life are embracing. As a minimally invasive cosmetic procedure, treatment is easy and quick — and patients don’t need to take time off work. Plus, it’s increasingly easy to find local providers — especially if more medical professionals like you will add it to their practice offerings.

2. There’s been a shift in cultural values. There’s greater social acceptance than ever before of aesthetic injections. Just a decade ago, many people considered Botox injections vain or even silly, but people have a great level of acceptance now. That’s partly because of increasing media coverage of celebrities who openly have Botox treatments and the growing acceptance of beauty treatments overall. This social acceptance is expected to grow even more in the coming decades.

3. People spend more on beauty products and services. According to statistics, women now spend nearly $500 billion a year on beauty products. And that doesn’t take into consideration the spending men do on beauty products as well. The economy is looking up, and so is the projected level of spending on beauty treatments and products — and that includes Botox injections.

4. Botox spending doesn’t depend on the economy. Even when the economy has been bad, people have proven that they will still get Botox. Sales of Botox dipped only slightly in the economic downturn of 2008 and 2009 while other treatments and sales fell more dramatically. Then after the downturn, sales of Botox quickly jumped by double digits even though much of the economy recovered very slowly.

5. Botox treatment methods have gotten better. Those who inject Botox are being trained better than ever before, and Botox injectors now realize that these treatments require more than a cookie-cutter approach. Results are so much better than a decade ago because injectors are better than ever. When you get Botox training today, you’re trained in techniques that didn’t exist a few years ago. And because patients are more satisfied with results, they’re more likely to choose Botox treatment again and again.

6. The age group 40-54 is growing. This group is mature in their careers in many cases and often earns a high wage. And they need to take action to stave off aging to keep their jobs and continue advancing in their chosen career fields, so they spend on a variety of beauty products. This age group is getting larger every day as well. You’ll notice anti-aging products being advertised to this group more than in the past, so even more of these Baby Boomers are becoming aware of the issue. This group accounts for as much as 50 percent of the Botox market, and with additional education as well as the continued maturing of society, this group will grow further.

7. Young adults are increasingly turning to Botox. In fact, the demand has never been higher for Botox among people in their 30s. The growth in this group has been about 4 percent a year. That makes sense because at age 35, skin begins to lose elasticity as collagen production decreases. Lines and wrinkles begin to show up. And thanks to better education of the public about Botox, people in their 30s now know that Botox is a viable and readily available treatment option. Still, this market remains relatively untapped by comparison with the older age group, so there is enormous potential there for those who get into the Botox injection business to grab these clients as they age into the group and then keep them for life.

8. People are becoming aware of preventative Botox. Younger people are starting to realize that Botox isn’t just used for correction of cosmetic issues. Studies have made it clear that Botox can actually prevent lines and wrinkles of the face from developing and from becoming more noticeable if they’ve already developed. This is a relatively new finding, so potential clients are only just coming around to this reality. If face muscles can’t form or strengthen lines, the lines will be less prominent throughout the patient’s lifetime. Young adults are only now learning that a proactive approach using Botox can make a significant difference in the way they look later in life.

9. The “bro-tox” era has arrived. Men are more frequently choosing Botox, dermal fillers and related cosmetic procedures than ever before. Demand from 2000 until the present increased among men more than 300 percent. Many men want to get rid of their furrowed brows in favor of a more fit, youthful and refreshed look. Lines can equate to stress, worry and anger, and those things don’t make a positive impression. With more competition in the workplace and the social scene, this pressure has never been stronger than it is now. Men are still just a small percentage of all Botox clients, so a medical professional just getting Botox training has a large pool of male potential clients he or she can tap into.

10. Off-label usage of Botox is growing. While Botox is FDA-approved for only a limited number of areas on the face, advanced Botox injectors are using it to treat more areas than ever before. Botox Cosmetic is being used with great success to treat the depressor anguli oris muscles to correct dropping of the mouth corners. And it can be used with care to tighten the neck and improve the profile. Many experts predict that off-label use will continue to grow, and some off-label uses could also become FDA-approved. Either way, this increases the overall usage of Botox.

11. New uses for Botox have recently been approved. Originally, Botox was approved in 2002 to treat frown lines. One of the most recently approved uses is for lateral canthal lines — or crow’s feet. As more and more uses are proven, additional FDA approvals will be granted, adding to the uses for this preparation and the publicity and public knowledge about it. Of course, this even further increases the already strong demand for Botox injections and well-trained medical professionals to do the injections.

What it boils down to is this: more and more people are opting for the needle to meet their cosmetic needs. And that increases the need for injectors and the financial opportunities for those who decide to get Botox training and go into the Botox injection business.

Where Botox is concerned, there’s more than enough demand to go around.

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How to Treat Cervical Dystonia with Botox

cervical dystonia botox injection sitesCervical Dystonia is a condition that has lately been highlighted because of its increased incidence. Rather, the incidence is the same, but the diagnosis has become more accurate. Cervical dystonia is also called spastic or spasmodic torticollis, a condition in which there is ‘wry neck’, or twisting of the muscles of the neck on one side. This can be moderately to severely painful, and may become a transient or chronic condition. Women are affected more commonly than men, especially in their middle ages. The neck develops this random, automatic ‘swing’ to the front or back, and it can be very sudden too. The condition generally stabilizes after reaching a particular intensity, and can actually undergo spontaneous remission on its own, but this does not happen very often. Treatment is by need, supportive, as there is no cure for it, but good pain management and treatment approach can make a world of difference to the patient’s quality of life.

One such treatment approach is Botox. Botox is very well known because of its role in cosmetic medicine, but it has tremendous therapeutic applications as well. Botox is basically a derivative of the Botulinum toxin that is produced by a bacterium called Clostridium botulinum. This potent toxin is used in minuscule amounts and injected into the muscles that have contracted and caused to the neck to ‘wry’, or spasmodically contract on one side. When injected, the tiny dose of Botox acts at a block at a site called the neuromuscular junction, and blocks Acetylcholine, the messenger from the nerves that tells the muscles what to do. When this ‘message’ or stimulus is interrupted, the muscles no longer contract, and the tension in the neck is released. This has to be done in very small doses, and individually into each muscle that has contractured, therefore Botox is useful for conditions like cervical dystonia, where small muscle groups are involved. It cannot be used in large doses or for generalized dystonias where large muscle groups are affected.

While the relief is not immediate, it is effective and in about 4-6 days, a very significant reduction in the torticollis can be seen and felt. It can be measured by an electromyograph as well. Patients do not hold the awkward neck posture that they were previously forced to, and the respite can last up to 4 months, with proper application of Botox. The treatment can be repeated as necessary, but it is management for the cervical dystonia, not the cure. Occurrence of side effects is very rare, usually limited to a little pain or minor bruising at the site of pain, which quickly diminishes. Very few patients have significant adverse effects like drooping of the eyelids, or difficulty is swallowing, etc. If these are very pronounced, then they should be told to the doctor, to discuss alternate routes and treatment plans, but again, this is a rare occurrence.

The type of botulinum toxin to be used is usually decided upon by the doctor. Generally, people above the age of sixteen can be given Botox to treat cervical dystonia, as long as they have no history of allergic reaction to Botox or no serious side effects. It is avoided in women who are pregnant or breast feeding as it is not confirmed whether or not Botox can reach the baby, but everyone else is a potential candidate for Botox to treat cervical dystonia. Botox helps these patients in regaining their posture and restoring their quality of life with better muscle and pain management.

Sign up for Dr. Katz’s Botox Training Program to learn more.

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