Categories: Botulinum Toxin

Botox vs Xeomin: Which is Better?

When comparing two very similar products it is often difficult to say which is the better of the two. Both Botox and Xeomin are type-A Botulinum toxins. They are alike in that they contain some of the same ingredients and come in similar packaging. Similar, but different.

Where the difference comes in is that Botox contains an accompanying protein that detaches itself after being injected, and Xeomin does not. It is a purer type due to not having this other protein with it. The effects, however, are pretty much the same. So again, similarities and differences.

Both are used to treat:
● Crow’s feet
● Forehead lines
● Frown lines

One thing that Xeomin is very good for is the glabella wrinkles (furrows between the eyebrows). Its effectiveness has been proven in the US and Europe for this purpose. For the most part, Botox, Xeomin, and Dysport are all similar products. They are all type-A neurotoxins and produce very similar results. The differences between the products are in how much is needed to produce the same results.

For instance, it is only an estimation that “it takes one vial of Xeomin to produce results equal to the same amount of Botox”, or that it takes “two times as many vials of Dysport to have the same effect as a single unit of Botox.” These estimates are not an accurate predictor of success. They are just guidelines when it comes to accurate dosing. One patient may need more or less than another.

The results of both Xeomin and Botox are temporary. Both wear off over time and the nerve impulses are restored. Both treatments require repeated applications every 3-6 months to maintain the results.

If you have tried Xeomin but did not achieve the results you wanted it may not be that it didn’t work, but that you needed a larger dose to be effective. Again there are factors that are different for every person so it is very difficult to predict how well it will work.

The differences with Botox and Xeomin is that there is less chance of an allergic reaction due to not having the additional protein, it does not have to be refrigerated (shelf-stable) and may be better tolerated by people sensitive to Botox. The additional protein in Botox may be what makes it last longer because it takes longer to be metabolized in the body.

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