Botox And Other Injectables Booming, Thanks To Zoom And Selfies

botox upward trend

botox upward trend

For Botox injectors, the rise of selfie culture and the increase in video calls and online conferencing are great for business. While Botox was once considered a last-ditch effort to save middle-aged faces from the ravages of time, today men and women of all ages are turning to injectable cosmetic treatments. Teen girls want to look like the hottest social media influencers while boys and men are increasingly wanting to stop aging before it starts while enhancing their lips and jawlines.

An astounding 14 million nonsurgical cosmetic procedures were conducted around the world in 2020, an increase of more than a million from 2018 statistics. Even a global pandemic didn’t appear to hold numbers down.

Worldwide sales of noninvasive cosmetic treatments stand at around $60 billion, and that could triple or more by 2030, according to analytics firm Research and Markets. Much of that growth will be from injectables like Botox and dermal fillers.

The reason for the astounding growth? High-resolution Zoom meetings and other video calls plus the prevalence of selfies among some groups in society get much of the credit. Some apps have filters that help users see what they might look like with some enhancements to their face. The contrast between what they see on a video call and what they see through a filter can be dramatic and unsettling for some people.

Stats Prove Recurring Revenue For Injectors

In 2020, there were about 2.4 million injectable procedures performed even with some medical and aesthetics offices closed due to the pandemic. In Germany, there were about 700,000 such treatments in 2020. Demand reached half a million procedures that year in Brazil, even though people generally have less disposable income there.

In Asia, demand is particularly strong for what’s called “prejuvenation” – the desire to stop lines and other signs of aging before they start by having cosmetic procedures in the teen years and early 20s.

These statistics mean recurring revenue for the medical and dental offices, spas and aesthetic treatment centers around the globe that offer injectables. Because Botox and dermal filler treatments must be done every few months, satisfied clients will return again and again, and a younger start means more business for injectors.

Investors have put more than $3 billion into more than 400 aesthetic clinics in the last 5 years, according to consulting firm McKinsey. American pharmaceutical company AbbVie paid $63 billion in 2020 for Allergan, the company that makes Botox and filler Juvederm and controls almost half the injectables market.

New products from companies in South Korea, France and elsewhere threaten Allergan’s dominance but only serve to expand the demand for and availability of injectables.

Some fillers now contain hyaluronic acid, an ingredient familiar to many people who use skincare products and therefore less off-putting than Botox and other fillers. Fillers are even being made from a patient’s own blood or stem cells, also more appealing to some consumers.

One caveat, however: The increasing desire for injectables among younger people has caught the attention of regulators in some jurisdictions. In England, for example, the government has banned treatments for those under age 18 and now requires that all injectors to get a license. In the United States, each state makes its own rules for Botox and fillers, which vary widely.

If you’re an aesthetic or medical professional ready to get your share of the injectables market, Dentox can help by providing Botox and dermal filler training on your terms – in person, live online or on demand. All Dentox training is hands-on even when conducted remotely and is taught by America’s most experienced injectables instructor, Dr. Howard Katz. Learn more or sign up for Dentox training now.


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